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   |Is facility=True
 
   |Is facility=True
 
   |Has ace=Tiana Ringer;tringer19@georgefox.edu
 
   |Has ace=Tiana Ringer;tringer19@georgefox.edu
   |Has certification=https://foxtale.georgefox.edu/moodle/course/view.php?id=30471
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   |Has certification=https://georgefox.instructure.com/courses/1252
 
}}
 
}}
 
__TOC__
 
__TOC__
    
=Schedule=
 
=Schedule=
View the most up-to-date {{PAGENAME}} schedule [https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1xCN_BBKVIlBQyfPtv62ENxinOEKwJADMFcH0Gyy-ul8/edit?usp=sharing on this Google Sheet.]
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View the most up-to-date {{PAGENAME}} schedule [https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/14WiQypaqa_Y7ZhVRLeUJ3RdiiTvJ-6q6ma2SderZcIM/edit#gid=0 On this Google sheet]
 
      
=Equipment Overview =
 
=Equipment Overview =
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  |mainlabel=Name
 
}}
 
}}
 
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{{#ask:
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[[Is equipment::True]][[Has icon::+]] [[Is located in facility::Machine Shop]]
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|?Has icon=Icon
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|?Is located in facility
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|format=plainlist
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|template=EquipmentIconGallery
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|outrotemplate=EquipmentIconGalleryOutro
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|limit=100
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|sort=Is located in facility
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==[[3 commandments]]==
 
==[[3 commandments]]==
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Please put back the Machinery the way you found it. Clean up chips and any messes you make. NEVER use shop air to clean off the machines.
 
Please put back the Machinery the way you found it. Clean up chips and any messes you make. NEVER use shop air to clean off the machines.
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Always put any unused materials back on the storage shelf, and throw away unusable scrap.
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Always put any unused materials back on the storage shelf, and put small pieces in the scrap box.
    
Always leave the space better than you found it.
 
Always leave the space better than you found it.
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==General Machine Shop Knowledge==
 
==General Machine Shop Knowledge==
Welding is the process of joining metals together. It is a form of additive manufacturing. There are several different types of welding, and the Welding Lab uses most of these including spot welding.  
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Machining is the process of removing material so it is subtractive manufacturing. We have a variety of machines in the shop.  
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In the Welding Lab, metals are joined together using MIG (Metal Inert Gas), TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas), Stick and spot welding.   
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The 3 main processes include milling, turning, and drilling.   
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Each welder has its own special purpose and benefits.  MIG is fast and much easier to learn than TIG welding. Spot welding is only used with sheet metal. TIG welding produces very clean welds and the heat is more confined to a smaller area. TIG will also allow you to weld very thin metals.  
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Each machine has its own special purpose and benefits.  The drill press will produce holes quickly but normally has less precision than using a milling machine.  The lathe is normally used for making round parts and drilling. The metal laser is good for making fast precise cuts in sheet metal. The waterjet can cut steel up to 1" thick but it takes a long time to cut thick materials. The finger brake allows you to make bends in sheet metal.  The shear is good for cutting straight lines in thin sheet metal or making smaller pieces.
 
   
 
   
These are a few good steps to having a successful weld.   
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Here are a few good steps to being successful in the Machine Shop.   
* Make sure the materials have no coatings. Welding of some coatings like galvanized metal can produce toxic fumes.  
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* Make sure your workpiece is held securely before making cuts.  
* Materials should be properly prepped and clean for best results.  
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* Metal can be hot and sharp so always be careful when picking up material pieces.  
* Make sure the process you are using is correct for your material type.  
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* Make sure you you have been properly trained before attempting to use a machine.  
* Double check the weld settings and use a piece of scrap to practice before welding on your project.
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* Keep hands away from moving parts on machines.
* Only weld steel and aluminum. Do not attempt to weld unknown materials.  
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* Always ask if you have questions on how to do something.  
 
Here are a couple things to keep in mind:
 
Here are a couple things to keep in mind:
* Material will be very hot after welding so always think before touching.
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* Material can be very hot after machining.
* Make sure the welder is properly grounded before attempting to weld.
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* Machining can produce very sharp edges.
* Never weld in wet clothes or around water.  
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* Never try to operate machinery when you are tired.  
* Never try to weld any type of tank that has ever held flammable liquids. This is very dangerous and can explode!
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* Never work in the shop with loose clothing or items that could get pulled into a machine.
* Always check your welding hood settings prior to welding. (start with a darker setting and work your way down.
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* Welding takes lots of practice so don't be afraid to ask for help.  
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== Canvas Certification ==
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Before working with any of the equipment in the Machine Shop you will need to take the [https://georgefox.instructure.com/courses/1252 general lab quiz] as well as the specific quiz for each machine you are trying to use.
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==== <span id="SLA Printing Anchor">SLA Printing</span> ====
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[[File:InvertedSLA.png|302x302px|thumb|right|Inverted SLA Process]]
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Stereolithography, SLA, is a part of the manufacturing technology of vat polymerization. This means a light source (laser) is used to cure liquid resin into a hard plastic.
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The Form 2 is the only 3D printer that the Prototype Lab has that is an SLA printer. It utilizes the Upside Down or Inverted orientation.
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The resin tank has a clear bottom with a surface the resin will not stick to. This allows the resin to cure against the bottom of the tank.
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The build platform is lowered into the resin until it is hovering above the bottom surface of the tank, as far away as the height of the layer to be constructed.
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The laser is directed through the bottom of the tank and cures a layer of resin onto the build platform. Then, the resin tank slides over and the build platform raises. The wiper will then sweep across the tank to circulate the resin.
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The build platform will lower again, and the process will be repeated until the print is completed.
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Due to friction caused by de-laminating every layer, every part should be canted in its orientation. This means the part should be angled to reduce the cross sectional area needing to be shifted to de-laminate each layer. This de-lamination also causes the Form 2 to be the Prototype Lab's slowest 3D printer.
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Once a part is finished on the Form 2, it must be removed off of the build plate. Try to avoid scraping the build plate when removing parts. Any excess resin must be washed off using the Form Wash, the part must be air dried so that any isopropyl alcohol from the Wash has evaporated, the part should be cured in the Form Cure, and supports should be clipped off. Any remaining support marks can be sanded off if so desired.
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Extra information on SLA Printing can be found [https://formlabs.com/blog/ultimate-guide-to-stereolithography-sla-3d-printing/ here].
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==== <span id="FDM Printing Anchor">FDM Printing</span> ====
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Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) printers use a thermoplastic filament, which is heated to its melting point, then extruded to create layers which then build an object. There are many different types of FDM printers. Some use a modeling material and a support material, some just use a modeling material which when creating support will use a different style of layering that allows the filament to break off easily, some are able to use multiple filaments at once allowing for multicolored objects to be created. [[File:Filament_Spool.jpg|250px|thumb|right|Example of a filament spool for a FDM printer.]]
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Both Stratasys printers (Dimension and F370) use soluble support filament (the support filament dissolves in a heated sodium hydroxide bath), the Prusa printers use only a model material, and the Markforge printer only uses model material as well (however it will layer another filament for extra support).
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The filament for these printers comes in spools (basically thin plastic ropes that are wound up). The filament is fed through an extruder head, heated to the desired temperature, then extruded (similar to what happens with a hot glue gun).
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FDM printers can work with various materials, in the Prototype Lab we mainly stick to ABS which is used by the Stratasys machines and PLA which is used by the Prusas. The Markforge uses a material called Onyx (nylon and plastic mix) and will layer in another filament such as Carbon Fiber, Kevlar, etc.
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==General Bead Blasting Knowledge==
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Bead blasting is the process of using compressed air to propel small glass beads for ablating and cleaning a material surface.  Different types of blast media are used in industry including Soda, Walnut shells, Sand and many more material types.
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<br>These are a few good steps to having a Success with glass beading. 
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* Make sure the material is free from heavy grease and dirt.
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* The material needs to physically fit into the blast cabinet. 
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Here are a couple things to keep in mind:
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* Never point the nozzle at the gloves or window.
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* Make sure the power switch is turned on before use.
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* Always wait 5 minutes after use before opening the cabinet door.
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* Never try to bead blast anything flammable. Blasting can sometimes create sparks.
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*Never activate the foot pedal with the cabinet door open.
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{{#ask:
 
{{#ask:
 
  [[Is equipment::True]]
 
  [[Is equipment::True]]
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  |imageproperty=Has icon
 
  |imageproperty=Has icon
 
}}
 
}}
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== Foxtale Certification ==
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Before working with any of the equipment in the prototype lab you will need to take the [https://foxtale.georgefox.edu/moodle/course/view.php?id=30471 general lab quiz] as well as the specific quiz for each machine you are trying to use. The enrollment code for all of the quizzes is MakerHub.
 

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